Andrei Tarkovsky’s Cinematography Style Is Shown In This Fantastic Montage

by Bret Hoy1 Comment

Because of the internet and streaming services like Amazon Prime, Netflix and Hulu, auteurship amongst filmmakers is at its most volatile moment.

(planetMitch note: don’t you just love when people teach you new words? In reviewing what Bret wrote, I had to look up “auteurship” – thanks Bret for teaching me a new word!)

Content is being valued in a way entirely different than the past— a way that might be damaging the ways that we create. While there are more avenues and easy ways of distributing content, that same content is held to an entirely different standard. We could talk about this forever, but one thing is for sure. Auteurs will never be the same.

That doesn’t mean we can’t still take queues from those that have come before us. In fact, it may be more important than ever to preserve tradition and inspire ourselves with the work of auteurs like Kazan, Bergmann and Tarkovsky.

Tarkovsky specifically has had an amazing re-invigoration now that remastering has finally made it somewhat through his filmography. The films and the beautiful, elegant choreographed style with which he made them is captured in this succinct, but powerful piece about his cinematography.

Andrei Tarkovksy, Cinema of the Soul is a montage of some of Tarkovsky’s greatest moments on film, put together to give you a great idea of the pacing and feel of his films.

If you’re not familiar with Tarkovsky, watch this video, get inspired, then binge.

Andrei Tarkovsky, Cinema of the Soul

(cover photo credit: snap from video)

Bret Hoy

Bret Hoy

Bret Hoy is a filmmaker, photographer and writer based out of St. Louis, Missouri. Mainly focused on documentary and experimental film, he has produced, directed, shot and edited many short films and a few long form works.

He shoots a lot and often.
Bret Hoy

Comments

  1. “That doesn’t mean we can’t still take queues from those that have come before us.”

    queues = lining up to wait turn

    cues = signal for action

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