DxO OF DxOMark & DxO ONE Fame Offering 50% Off Discount On Their Amazing Photography Software Through December 25

by Karin GottschalkLeave a Comment

DxO’s recent announcement via downloadable PDF that their collection of three digital stills processing applications, DxO OpticsPro, DxO FilmPack and DxO ViewPoint, available separately or as DxO Photo Suite, came as welcome news. The latest version of each now supports seven additional cameras including Apple’s iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, the Pentax 645D, and Panasonic’s Lumix GX-8, GF-7, G-7 and DMC-ZS50/DMC-TZ70.

When I wrote my article on the Panasonic Lumix GX8, I made do with a workaround that did not make the very best out of the amazing 20MP stills images the GX8 produces. Now I can go back to relying on DxO’s software when needing realistic photographic renditions, especially when an analog look and feel will best communicate my intentions.

50% off DxO software through December 25, 2015!

The other good news from DxO is that the firm is offering a “biggest sale ever” 50%-off discount on all three software products through, which I assume means up until and including, Christmas Day, December 25.

If you don’t wish to commit to the discount right now but wish to try all three applications out first, time-limited trial versions are available to download right now. The trials last for 30 days and are fully functional, without watermarks or other impositions on your images.

I recommend downloading and trying out all three applications which work in unison or separately depending on your preferences and workflow. They install as standalone applications and as plug-ins for major image-editing software such as Adobe’s Lightroom and Photoshop.

DxO FilmPack also works as a plug-in, in effect, for DxO OpticsPro, supplying extra analog film emulations that are uncannily accurate. OpticsPro contains a subset of ViewPoint’s lens distortion and perspective correction tools, though if you shoot plenty of architecture and cityscapes then the full version of ViewPoint will be enormous befit.

At 50% off, consider Elite versus Essentials.

With such a big price discount, consider buying the Elite editions of OpticsPro and FilmPack. Their Essential editions are very good, but more controls and features are included in Elite including two my favorites, Prime Raw denoising and ClearView.

Prime has been a lifesaver when shooting at high ISOs in available darkness, and ClearView is an essential for hazy scenes shot, for example, around Sydney Harbour. I understand it is also brilliant at removing haze when shooting in mountainous regions. Must get to those mountainous regions one day!

Also shot with Panasonic Lumix GX8 and Panasonic LUMIX G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH II prime lens then processed with DxO OpticsPro Elite using Tri-X black-and-white film emulation and split toning in selenium and gold.

Also shot with Panasonic Lumix GX8 and Panasonic LUMIX G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH II prime lens then processed with DxO OpticsPro Elite using Tri-X black-and-white film emulation and split toning in selenium and gold.

The other benefit of all three is their reliance on DxO’s in-depth sensor and lens profiles. DxO, under its DxOMark program, “has extensively analyzed the image and video quality of over 9,000 cameras, lenses and mobile phones” and its freely-available DxOMark reports have become industry essentials. Camera users also rely on DxOMark reports when considering new camera and lens purchases as I did when contemplating the Panasonic Lumix GX8.

Another seldom-mentioned benefit of DxOMark’s camera profiling is that OpticsPro allows you to emulate sensors from cameras very different to the one you shot on. For example, I selected the Pentax 645D camera body profile for the color image on this page. It was actually shot on a Panasonic GX8.

Photograph made with the Panasonic Lumix GX8 and Panasonic LUMIX G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH II prime lens, processed in DxO OpticsPro Elite using Pentax 645D camera body profile and applying perspective correction.

Photograph made with the Panasonic Lumix GX8 and Panasonic LUMIX G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH II prime lens, processed in DxO OpticsPro Elite using Pentax 645D camera body profile and applying perspective correction.

The black-and-white image on this page, also shot on the GX8 as a full color photograph, was processed in DxO OpticsPro using its Tri-X from profile and I applied chemical-free selenium/gold split toning to achieve a similar result to the analog processes that adversely affected my health some years ago.

Biggest photo processing software sale ever at DxO, 50% off all four through December 25! Click To Tweet

Oh and one more thing. I noticed this question while doing my research for this article, under the “Shoot More, Edit Less” subhead at the DxOMark front page:

Did you know DxOMark's tests enable you to auto-correct images and videos based on the equipment you use?

I have not applied DxO software to video before, but I was prompted to do some quick and dirty tests just now. I imported some footage into Photoshop using its Motion workspace, fiddled about a bit, applied an analog film emulation via the DxO FilmPack plug-in, rendered a short clip and hey presto, it worked!

Food for thought and further exploration. Now to dig into the best workflow for applying DxO products to movie footage. If any of you have already worked out how to auto-correct videos with DxO software then please share it here!

(cover photo credit: snap from Karin Gottschalk)

Karin Gottschalk

Karin Gottschalk

Karin is a documentary moviemaker, journalist, photographer and teacher who conceived and cofounded an influential, globally-read, Australian magazine of contemporary art, culture and photography. While based in Europe, contributing to the magazine and working in advertising, she visualised a future telling the same sorts of stories with a movie camera and audio recorder. Now back in her home base in Sydney, Karin is pursuing her goal of becoming an independent, one-person, backpack multimedia journalist and documentary moviemaker. Mentorless and un-filmschooled, she is constantly learning and sharpening up her skill set.
Karin Gottschalk

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