The Atomos Bare Bones Monitor Recorders Explained

by Bret HoyLeave a Comment

Isn’t it fantastic when a company truly listens to its customers? Atomos with it’s new Bare bones Package have definitely done that.

Within just a few years, Atomos have become a common name in the industry by releasing high quality monitors/recorders that are compatible with a very wide range of cameras. In late 2014, they generated more hype than ever with the release of the Atomos Shogun, which records 30p 4k and 120p 1080. In addition to releasing the monitor/recorder, they provide the customer with a durable case that includes virtually all they need to use the kit on day one.

While this is great for the shooter that is getting started with Atomos gear, it’s unnecessary for those that have already been loyally shooting with Atomos monitors and recorders. They didn’t want to pay for the extras that they already had. And rightfully so.

Atomos has answered their calls with a cheaper package for all of their recorders. Instead of including all of the extra accessories (HPRC hard case, AC adapter, SSD media cases, D- Tap adapter, 5200mAh battery, battery charger, XLR breakout cable and SSD docking station), they get a secure, handheld package that includes the AC Adapter, an SSD media case and the unit itself.

This cuts the extra cost out of the equation, making it cheaper for you to buy another one of their products. All Atomos monitor/recorders are currently available with the barebones option.

Shogun Barebones: $1695
Samurai Blade Barebones: $795
Ninja Blade Barebones: $795
Ninja 2 Barebones: $395

Atomos BareBones Product Range

The Entire Atomos Bare Bones Monitor Recorders Explained

Atomos Bare Bones Image

Via Cinescopophilia:

The Atomos Shogun was one of the success stories of late 2014, making 4K affordable, manageable and accessible to more filmmakers and helping to accelerate the changeover from HD to 4K all while making production simpler and more affordable. A new variant of the Shogun called Shogun ‘Bare Bones’ will soon be available at an even cheaper price point of $1695.

The current Shogun model (MSRP $1995) includes not only the main Shogun unit but also over $500 of accessories to get users started right away (HPRC hard case, AC adapter, SSD media cases, D- Tap adapter, 5200mAh battery, battery charger, XLR breakout cable and SSD docking station). Customers and channel alike have requested a unit only with AC adaptor version, in order to utilise legacy equipment they already own from Atomos and camera products as well as making a second Shogun unit more affordable. In an effort to meet this request and drive 4K adoption even faster, Atomos have announced a ‘Bare Bones’ version of the Shogun that removes all accessories except an SSD media case and AC power supply, we have also included a high quality soft carry case for protection, all for the low price of $1695. The complete suite of accessories will also be available for $395.

Shogun Bare Bones is all about accelerating the move to 4K at breakneck speed in combination with the amazing Japanese 4K high quality affordable cameras, allowing customers to utilise legacy Atomos accessories they already own.” said Jeromy Young CEO of Atomos. “We still expect the full Battle Ready Shogun loaded with accessories to be popular but now users can decide what makes sense for their first and second 4K camera rig.”

Read full article at Cinescopophilia “The Entire Atomos Bare Bones Monitor Recorders Explained”

Source: Atomos

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(cover photo credit: snap from the video)

Bret Hoy

Bret Hoy

Bret Hoy is a filmmaker, photographer and writer based out of St. Louis, Missouri. Mainly focused on documentary and experimental film, he has produced, directed, shot and edited many short films and a few long form works.

He shoots a lot and often.
Bret Hoy

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