Rocket Rooster Releases Cinema Colour II — Big, Generous New LUT Set with Cinema Neg & Print Looks

by Karin GottschalkLeave a Comment

Cinematic LUT maker Rocket Rooster has released Cinema Colour II, building on the firm’s original LUT collection named, simply, Cinema Colour.

The new set adds a layer or two of complexity and subtle color control with the option of layering print LUT upon negative LUT upon log to Rec. 709 LUT conversion LUT, if that is the way you want to go. Cinema Colour II also includes simpler options involving just one or two LUTs in a similar way to how Rocket Rooster’s first LUT set works.

Almost immediately after I downloaded the first version of Cinema Colour II an email from Rocket Rooster arrived telling me they had issued an update with more LUTs to complement the already copious set I had just installed onto my production iMac.

And not long after that, a similar email arrived with more variations again. Generous or what? Looks like Rocket Rooster has taken a leaf out of Panasonic or Fujifilm’s books and is looking after its users well after buying a new product, with ongoing software updates.

So now I have three folders in my Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II folder, the original and two updates, containing almost too many film emulation, negative and print LUTs to count.

I am a longtime stills photographer using a wide range of color films, negative and color reversal, depending on client and application, and so I have a vast memory bank of color looks stored away in my mind.

The benefit of film emulation LUTs like Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II is that I can easily visualize the film-based look I am after while I am onset.

When I am back in front of the computer I can choose the relevant starter LUT, get close to what I had visualized, then add a print LUT and further enhance as needed. All the while with the assurance that my color choices are not a million miles from how analog negative and print film rendered results that I and most of my potential audience have become used to over years of movie viewing.

Frame-grab, a moment in a café, as winter begins. From my first couple of tryouts with Rocket Rooster’s Cinema Colour II. I wanted to accentuate the sometimes uneasy feeling of being in this local café which looks out onto a surrealist sculptural fountain in a plaza.

Frame-grab, a moment in a café, as winter sets in. From my first couple of tryouts with Rocket Rooster’s Cinema Colour II. I wanted to accentuate the sometimes uneasy feeling of being in this local café which looks out onto a surrealist sculptural fountain in a plaza.

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An even darker interpretation of this scene. The cold grey days of winter demand more grading work than I would normally apply during spring and summer. In these two examples I have applied a Log to negative LUT for GH4 footage shot with Matt Mosher’s M-Log picture style, followed by a Film Print LUT. Some secondary grading also applied.

screenshot_rocket_rooster_cinema_colour_ii

Rocket Rooster’s Cinema Colour II contains plenty of options for simpler and more complex approaches according to your needs. Best to read the manual first then experiment with LUT combos. Since Cinema Colour II’s initial release, Rocket Rooster released an update to its Pro pack version. Rocket Rooster then released a second updater for Cinema Colour II just before this article hit the publishing queue.

Rocket Rooster releases Cinema Colour II, big new LUT set with cinema neg & print looks. Click To Tweet

Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II

Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II Demo

Check out the NEW Cinema Colour II pack, the finest pack by Rocket Rooster yet!

The pack features over 30 different film negative and positive print emulation LUTs with LOG and Rec709 versions to chose from. As an added bonus you get an extra 20 creative grades/looks based off the pack to quickly get you something different.

Chose from hundreds of LUTs and variations of the core LUTs like the HsPRt set that are a mixture of both a Negative and an industry standard Kodak 2383 print Emulation LUT.

Note: None of the looks in the video have the colour altered even for skin tones and what you see is exactly what you get.

Find out more on the website rocketrooster.ninja/

The all new Looks pack is here, the Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II

Via Rocket Rooster:

The all new Looks pack is here, the Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II

The pack is based off Super 35 and Super 16 Film stock and features a set of film emulation LUTs that you can use to get the look of popular film stock in just a few clicks.

The pack features over 30 different film negative and positive print emulation LUTs with LOG and Rec709 versions to chose from. As an added bonus you get an extra 20 creative grades/looks based off the pack to quickly get you something different.

The pack also features of variations of the emulation LUTs to chose from giving you a wide variety to suit different needs.

The pack gives your footage an Authentic film look with a classic hollywood aesthetic. The pack is a fully fledged set of tools aimed for enthusiast and professional colourists and not simply drag and drop solution. While you can often get great looking footage with just a drag and drop workflow the pack was aimed to inspire your creativity and speed up your grades.

What's in the pack?

The pack consists of a set of 3D LUTs (also known as look up tables) that you can use to quickly apply looks to your footage in you NLE (non linear editor) or grading software to set a base for your final grade. The Pack has a series of LUTs based off popular feature film Stock and super 35 film. The film stocks come in both negative and positive print.

The pack also features a few film like creative looks that are great for quick and easy workflows.

Learn about the Rocket Rooster Cinema Colour II

(cover photo credit: snap from Rocket Rooster)

Karin Gottschalk

Karin Gottschalk

Karin is a documentary moviemaker, journalist, photographer and teacher who conceived and cofounded an influential, globally-read, Australian magazine of contemporary art, culture and photography. While based in Europe, contributing to the magazine and working in advertising, she visualised a future telling the same sorts of stories with a movie camera and audio recorder. Now back in her home base in Sydney, Karin is pursuing her goal of becoming an independent, one-person, backpack multimedia journalist and documentary moviemaker. Mentorless and un-filmschooled, she is constantly learning and sharpening up her skill set.
Karin Gottschalk

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