Apple Patent

Apple Scratches an Itch, GoPro Stock Breaks Out in Hives

by Hugh Brownstone2 Comments

OK, reading patents is like reading riders to bills passed by Congress these days: impossibly dry, boring beyond belief and purposely inscrutable to all but the select few who will benefit from it. Good thing we have people like Patently Apple and Wall Street to tell us what it all means – maybe.

Apple is granted a pile of patents; weaknesses in GoPro’s camera are mentioned in the filings; and GoPro’s stock drops as low as 18% in a day – before recovering.

A bit.

But here’s the dirty little secret: Wall Street wins whether a stock goes up OR down. What it needs is volatility (because it makes money in either direction), and that means it constantly needs big stories told to people with short memories.

Am I being unfair?

Maybe. Maybe not.

Turns out huge chunks of trading volume aren’t done by people anyway, but by machines. Yep. Software. So if a story causes people to start selling, it takes the machines to start selling bigger and much, much faster (if you haven’t already done so, you might want to check out Michael Lewis’ Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt.

Since GoPro (GPRO) went public back in June of 2014 with an initial offering price of $24 per share, its stock has traded as high as $98.47. While it opened on Tuesday (the day of Apple’s patent news) at $57.06 a share and dropped to $48.23 by 2:20 that afternoon, it recovered to almost $50 by the close.

So yeah: GoPro took a bath – although it could just as easily be taking its continuing bath because it has OTHER patent woes (Contour), or because the machines concluded its P/E multiple or earnings momentum or who-knows-what-else weren’t yummy enough – or too yummy to resist (the machines can short-sell, too).

All of which truly have nothing to do with whether or not using a GoPro helps you tell your story today, but might mean some awesome bonuses for the M&A boys six months from now.

Apple wins camera patent that sends GoPro stock tumbling

Apple Patent

 

Via getprismatic.com:

Shares of GoPro stock plummeted as much as 15% this afternoon after it was announced that Apple was awarded a patent that could put the wearable camera company in serious trouble.

Apple was granted a series of 34 patents by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office today relating to a camera system that can be mounted to helmets and scuba masks and controlled remotely. That patent specifically mentions weaknesses in GoPro’s system, which has sent investors worrying that Apple is aiming to crush the sports camera giant.

Read full article “Apple wins camera patent that sends GoPro stock tumbling”

 

Note: it is our policy to give credit as well as deserved traffic to our news sources – so we don't repost the entire article – sorry, I know you want the juicy bits, but I feel it is only fair that their site get the traffic and besides, you just might make a new friend and find an advertiser that has something you've never seen before

(cover photo credit: snap from getprismatic.com)

Hugh Brownstone

Hugh Brownstone

Hugh is the founder of Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions. He and the team write, direct, shoot, score, and edit web-centric films; conduct photo shoots; and write copy, white papers and blog posts. Hugh also writes screenplays (he recently optioned a TV pilot) and just published his first eBook (Apple's iPhone: The Next Video Revolution). If it's about telling stories, it's in their wheelhouse.

And always with the ambition of authenticity, humanity and wit.
Hugh Brownstone

Comments

  1. Weaknesses in GoPro design indeed.  How about stabilization?  Indoor filming under tungsten lights (in other words a selectable white balance option)!  24 fps option (however this might be addressed in GoPro 4).  GoPro is so overrated in so many ways and is strictly an outdoor sports camera.  It sucks indoors where I would use it most.

  2. I think John is being a little harsh or perhaps he is young.  It wasn’t that long ago that if you wanted to shoot video for home use it would cost $1,000 or more for a “camcorder” and that was mostly before HD.  If you then wanted to take it diving or snorkeling, another $1,000 or more was needed for an underwater housing.  Now you can do all that with a GoPro for $200 (for the base model, which is still HD).  Sure, improvements can always, and should be, made in a product and I believe GoPro listens to its customers for suggestions.  Any company that does not will be dead in the water before long (GM anyone?!)  I use my GoPro all the time for indoor and outdoor shooting and have always had good to great results.  Sometimes indoor I might add a small LED light or I tweek things in the excellent “free” GoPro software.  What I really love about the GoPro is how many after market items are now available to go with it.  Is GoPro the greatest mini action cam made?  You can argue over that for hours with DP’s and enthusiasts but one for thing is fact, they started something that is having a profound impact on our lives and, it’s a ton of FUN!  Does any one believe Apple would be looking into small action cams if there was only a small market for them?  As long as GoPro is around, and I think they will be for a long time, we, the consumers, will all benefit from the competition in the small action camera market.

Leave a Comment