Sony’s Next Magical Trick: 8K Mirrorless Full Frame Body in 2016

by Hugh Brownstone3 Comments

Yeah, OK, I JUST wrote another post saying that artistry trumps specifications, but holy smokes: Sony is rumored to be working on an 8K mirrorless DSLR-style body for 2016.

So what?

I recently dug up a post Ken Rockwell wrote back in 2008 that fellow planet5Dwriter Barry Andersson and I are arguing over (in a good-natured, collegial way) and will be writing about together in a separate piece: what is “the filmic look” and what role do megapixels play in it?

Some people like Rockwell; others don’t – but I’m a fan and I’m going to quote just one line from his post: “…you'd need a digital camera of about … 175 MP to see every last detail that makes [it] onto film…”

And I’m going to go one step further and quote BAFTA and Emmy-award winning documentary director Christopher Swann who schooled me when I asked him about megapixels and the filmic look:

“What everyone forgets is that film is an emulsion of silver particles with depth to it – and each particle reflects light in its own unique way. THIS – the tiny, random reflections — and how our brains process them — is what gives film its magic.”

I hadn’t though of that.

But what I do know is that beyond shallow depth of field, wide dynamic range and incredible color depth, 35mm films projected through old style projectors have dramatically more information than  35mm film which is scanned and then digitally projected.

How much information from digital sensors – and of what type – is enough to recreate the magic of film?

I have no idea – but I’d sure like to find out, and I’m pretty confident it’s more than HD or even 4K – so I’m going to be following the Sony story with great interest.

Then again, what do I know? I’m pleased by images that come out of my new iPhone 6, too.

Maybe the 80/20 rule applies to magic, too.

Sony Rumored to Be Working on an 8K Mirrorless Full Frame Camera That Will Arrive by 2016

via PetaPixel:

The phrase “megapixel war” has been thrown around for quite some time now, but could we be seeing the beginnings of a “K war”? Sony is rumored to be working on a mirrorless full frame camera that captures footage at a staggering 8K resolution.

The report comes from sonyalpharumors, which tells us that at least two “good sources” have informed them of this camera.

Sony Rumored to Be Working on an 8K Mirrorless

 

The camera is said to be similar in design to the current Sony A99, so it may be a top-of-the-line mirrorless camera featuring a DSLR-style body.

Sources are saying that Sony has been showing the camera to certain potential clients, and that the prototype camera may become official and arrive in time for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The company is reportedly telling people to “consider moving to Sony today because in 18-24 months you’ll be wishing your team were already comfortable with it.”

Read full article at PetaPixel “Sony Rumored to Be Working on an 8K Mirrorless Full Frame Camera That Will Arrive by 2016”

 

Note: it is our policy to give credit as well as deserved traffic to our news sources – so we don't repost the entire article – sorry, I know you want the juicy bits, but I feel it is only fair that their site get the traffic and besides, you just might make a new friend and find an advertiser that has something you've never seen before

(cover photo credit: snap from PetaPixel)

Hugh Brownstone

Hugh Brownstone

Hugh is the founder of Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions. He and the team write, direct, shoot, score, and edit web-centric films; conduct photo shoots; and write copy, white papers and blog posts. Hugh also writes screenplays (he recently optioned a TV pilot) and just published his first eBook (Apple's iPhone: The Next Video Revolution). If it's about telling stories, it's in their wheelhouse.

And always with the ambition of authenticity, humanity and wit.
Hugh Brownstone

Comments

  1. I have a problem with that :
    “What everyone forgets is that film is an emulsion of silver particles with depth to it – and each particle reflects light in its own unique way. THIS – the tiny, random reflections — and how our brains process them — is what gives film its magic.”

    What you see on the screen is a copy of a copy of a copy. So the tiny random reflections that you see have a meaning on the reel from the camera but don’t have any on the reel you see and were altered/changed many times in between…

    Correct me if I’m wrong

  2. MichelLuczak I quote my dear friend who writes:
    The magic happens as the light hits the silver on the film plane and is therefore fixed in the way the film looks when it is printed.
    it is true that a reproduction of a painting lacks the texture and scale of the original but the colours and the imperfections of the original remain through all reproduction processes.Also when you project light through film you do something unique which is another random process depending on the strength of the projector, the throw of the projector and the quality of the emulsion you are pushing the light through.
    Projecting video which is a refraction process rather than through the material as with film, will never ever have the look of projected film. Video is the process of number, each pixel has a unique binary expression and the sum of all those binary expressions is what you see on the screen.
    So for me, film versus video is art versus number, which as a Pure Mathematician who has spent his life in the arts is a uniquely understood dichotomy.

  3. HughBrownstone 

    Thank for this, there is a lot to think about.
    I’ll add one more thing: imagine tomorrow we have a 200MP DLP projector (meaning it uses micro-mirrors to give more or less light, with inter-reflexions between them, … , like the silver cristals, see where I’m going?). Would that be a way to approximate what we get with film? At this scale we would have a massive amount of low scale induced randomness, but of course, it will still be “simulated” and “pre-programmed”…

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