A Rundown of The Latest EOS 7D Mark II Information

by Hugh Brownstone2 Comments

Our friends over at Canon Rumors are pretty good at separating the wheat from the chaff, so it seemed appropriate to share their August 15th update on what appears to be an upcoming Canon 7D Mk II.

Except – at the moment – there’s really not very much to tell that would get you, our dear readers, particularly excited.

  • EOS-1 build quality? Uh, OK. But we weren’t unhappy with the build quality of the first one. And our expectations around weight are being shifted by cameras like …yup, the Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7s.
  • EOS-1 style top plate? Ain’t gonna make or break the shot, though it’s a nice touch for extant 1D C users.
  • No WiFi? Harumph. Being able to control the camera from an iPhone or iPad is pretty darned useful, and once again, our expectations have been raised by other players in the market.
  • Super durable LCD cover? How many of you shattered your old one? No touch screen? I guess point and tap follow focus like on the SL1 is not in the cards?  And is it just me, or does that super durable LCD cover sound suspiciously like a similar Leica update of not all that long ago?
  • There is 12fps shooting (or faster), and that is pretty great for sports and dance photographers — but it's neither here nor there for video, portraiture or landscape.
  • The promise of Dual Pixel autofocus already present on the 70D is interesting, though not all that much unless it is accompanied by other things (otherwise, why not just get the 70D and use whatever is left over for something else?). And while this last point makes the “New sensor technology (multi-layer)” and “New AF system” at least intriguing, we don’t know what they actually mean.

All of which, when you think about it, is simply 238 words’ worth of “how do you keep an idiot in suspense?”

Yep, guilty as charged.

A Rundown of EOS 7D Mark II Information

Via Canon Rumors:

There’s not a lot being said about the upcoming DSLR from Canon. We’re getting little bits of information, and what we’re getting is going to be true. However, Canon Japan has been very proactive in stopping leaks within the various subsidiaries of Canon Inc. We, and others have been told that some past reviewers and journalists have been left out of the loop this go around. Canon seems to be taking leaks a lot more seriously than Sony and Nikon, who in my opinion, leak stuff themselves.



A Rundown of EOS 7D Mark II Information

This is a small rundown of what we know and can publish about the EOS 7D Mark II (If that’s what it’s called).

  • Full metal body (EOS-1 build quality)
  • EOS-1 style top plate
  • New sensor technology (multi layer)
  • No Wifi built-in
  • Not touch screen, super durable LCD cover
  • 12fps shooting (or faster)
  • Dual Pixel AF
  • New AF system

Read full article on Canon Rumors “A Rundown of EOS 7D Mark II Information”

(cover photo credit: snap from Canon Rumors)

Hugh Brownstone

Hugh Brownstone

Hugh is the founder of Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions. He and the team write, direct, shoot, score, and edit web-centric films; conduct photo shoots; and write copy, white papers and blog posts. Hugh also writes screenplays (he recently optioned a TV pilot) and just published his first eBook (Apple's iPhone: The Next Video Revolution). If it's about telling stories, it's in their wheelhouse.

And always with the ambition of authenticity, humanity and wit.
Hugh Brownstone

Comments

  1. I have been searching for a decent smallish, system that has a WiFi control, especially with a iPhone or iPad.I should say I am a long time and devout Canon user. I’ll probably get a Panasonic GX7. Or maybe a Sony system. I looked at the Nikon V3. Nothing but and on/off switch for WiFi control. If the big companies want to remain big, they really do need to get off their cushions and have look around at what’s happening.

  2. My guess is that the “multi-layer” sensor for the 7D2 is something other than what’s shown in the patent — probably some form of back-illuminated sensor. Companies sometimes patent inventions without knowing whether they’ll ever exploit them. And note that, as shown, the five-layer is not patentable — it is a trivial and obvious extension of existing technology.
    A lens designed for silver photography could get away with tiny amounts of longitudinal chromatic aberration, because it would be desirable for red, green, and blue //not// to focus in the same plane. Electronic sensors changed that, because all colors were now “obliged” to focus in the same plane. How three- or five-layer sensors affect lens design is not clear to me. Anyone know for sure?

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