Adding motion to your timelapse without buying more gear with Panolapse

by Keith AlvendiaLeave a Comment

Are you a frustrated timelapse shooter? Frustrated because you know your timelapse would look better with more motion in it, but you don't have the cash to buy more gear, motion control units and such to make your camera move while you're shooting?

Well, it is possible now to add motion to your timelapse after it is shot!

Welcome this free tool called “Panolapse” — read more and watch the video below to see what is possible! This is causing quite a stir already in the timelapse section of the planet5D forums!

What is Panolapse?

Panolapse was originally developed for adding motion to the timelapses in the Blue Eden project (www.youtube.com/blueedenhd). The concept behind Panolapse is similar to that of 360 panorama viewers, using perspective warping to allow rotational movement. Set the camera's start and end keyframes, and Panolapse will interpolate the pan. Unlike standard software-editing programs that crop and slide a viewing window around, Panolapse corrects for perspective so that it appears as if the camera is actually pivoting inside a scene.

Panolapse is essentially the software version of a motorized head. The program is best used with wide-angle lenses that capture as much of the scene as possible. It works with all cameras such as full-frame sensor, crop-sensor, point-and-shoots, GoPros and fisheye lenses, which can allow up to 180 degree panning over 2 axis.



About Panolapse

Panolapse is a tool for adding rotational panning motion to time-lapse images and videos.

Panolapse is a tool for adding rotational panning motion to time-lapse images and videos.

How Panolapse Works with Timelapses

The concept of Panolapse is similar to 360 panorama viewers. Panolapse uses perspective correction to rotate the camera through a scene over multiple frames to create an animation.

The concept of Panolapse is similar to 360 panorama viewers. Panolapse uses perspective correction to rotate the camera through a scene over multiple frames to create an animation.

There are a few ways to create movement in time-lapse sequences. Some people mount the camera on a motorized track that slides, or a motorized head that rotates, or both. These systems are often heavy, fragile, and restrictive. Another approach uses standard video-editing software to digitally crop into a scene and slide the viewing window around. This approach can be helpful, but since it doesn't correct for changes in perspective, the resulting video can appear flat and unnatural.

Panolapse's movements are real-world accurate, allowing for natural panning motion. It cannot add sliding movement like a dolly on a rail, but it can add rotational head movement. Panolapse works best with wide-angle lenses, including fisheye lenses, allowing you to pan up to 180 degrees in two axis.

Panolapse 180 degree fisheye lens

A 180 degree fisheye lens

To download the Panolapse software, visit www.panolapse360.com/

(cover photo credit: snap from the video)

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