Flying People in New York City - YouTube

Flying People in New York City – it’s a bird! it’s a plane! no, it’s an RC plane!

by planetmitch5 Comments

Ok, I admit it right up front, this has very little to do with HDSLR (tho there is a very short clip of an RC drone with a DSLR on it but I don’t know if the whole clip was filmed with it)… but this is just cool and I love the concept – so I’m sharing it with you!

Remote Control planes made to look like people flying around the city of New York. Superman anyone?

Flying People in New York City

Description from youtube

Three human shaped RC planes were flown around New York City to create the illusion of people flying. Lots of fun.

The music track is "Unstoppable 2" by Tom Quick. Get it here: www.audionetwork.com/production-music/unstoppable_45675.aspx

via Flying People in New York City – YouTube.

[source: tweet from paul joy]

(cover photo credit: snap from the video)



4 comments
Aerial Expert
Aerial Expert

You mean the FAA. The FAA are only trying to regulate commercial use (paid for hire) of RC aircraft and not the hobby. These guys are just having a bit of fun. Only thing I didn't like was flying over the BK Bridge where the aircraft were visible to traffic. That could have caused drivers to lose focus and maybe have an accident. I've seen it happen before.

reggeee
reggeee

It might be fun, but totally irresponsible. RC aircraft are flying missiles and have been know to crash and cause some serious damage. The FCC is trying to regulate the hobby out of existence as it is, so these kind of idiots only make it harder to argue that it's safe. Pleas don't encourage this behavior.

reggeee
reggeee

No, i meant the FCC. they regulate the use of radio frequencies and are constantly trying to limit channels and frequencies available to the hobby. Since 911, they have been trying to make it so only licensed operators can fly RC, effectively killing the hobby. And you're right, there have been many accidents where drivers were distracted by RC aircraft and it's usually the RC pilot flying where he shouldn't be, As in this case.

planetMitch
planetMitch

Thanks for your comment Reggeee -- tho I did notice these guys only flew the RC planes over the water - I think they know they should be careful and respectful of damage.

Trackbacks

  1. […] TechCrunch caught my eye this morning with an article about flying people spotted over New York City.  With subject matter like that, you can't NOT click through to see what's going on. Turns out in a recent publicity venture for their new movie "Chronicle", 20th Century Fox enlisted the help of ThinkModo to set up and execute a viral campaign that would turn heads and capture attention for the new movie release. Michael Krivicka from Thinkmodo explained the concept: “Since the three main characters of the movie have the ability to fly, we came up with the idea of staging a few “flying people” sightings around NYC. We achieved that illusion by having 3 custom-made aircraft (which were shaped like human beings) fly above designated areas in NYC and NJ.” Clever – and the video footage they provided is equally cool to watch – but that's not why I'm bringing this up.  Something the author of the original article said struck me as odd: "I personally think it’s a ballsy, creative and unique advertising tactic, yet I struggle with wondering how a person would tie the two things together — the movie and the freaky sightings." This is where some people fail to see how various types of marketing can in fact go viral rather easily, and help to spread the name of a brand or an event.  It's not about ensuring that consumers or your target audience make an immediate and direct connection to your brand, product or service, it's about garnering attention. In the case of the "flying people", there's no banner being towed behind them.  There's no subtle images in the background.  It's just flying people.  As heads turned and people had their cameras skyward, they were likely going to be discussing the incident around the water cool, subway, over lunch, etc.  You can bet journalists and bloggers would be reporting on it as well (TechCrunch, here, etc.).  That's the main goal of the marketing agency from go. We are all a part of the master marketing strategy. If they were obvious about it being a movie promo, the social share level would likely be far less.  "Oh I saw this cool thing with people flying near the bridge, they were promoting Chronicle."  Some people might agree that's cool and may mention it in passing. With this scenario, you had a lot more people going "oh my god did you hear about those flying people? Check out this video I uploaded" to which it's shared as people try to figure out what they're seeing in user-taken video. The connection is made via journalists who reveal it, making the connection and showing off the setup video.  There's an "Aha" moment for people who discover it and make the connection, and it becomes a memorable experience – one that inspired "ooo's"  and "aaaa's" – that can be linked to the studio brand and the movie. The very fact that TechCrunch and virtually thousands of others reported on it (even us!) makes it worthwhile from a publicity standpoint. Think about how you're marketing your business – when it comes down to Alabama marketing, are you pitching too hard or are you providing something of value that can become a talking point around your brand?TechCrunch caught my eye this morning with an article about flying people spotted over New York City…-people-spotted-over-new-york-city-film-at-nine/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29">article about flying people spotted over New York City.  With subject matter like that, you can't NOT click through to see what's going on. Turns out in a recent publicity venture for their new movie "Chronicle", 20th Century Fox enlisted the help of ThinkModo to set up and execute a viral campaign that would turn heads and capture attention for the new movie release. Michael Krivicka from Thinkmodo explained the concept: “Since the three main characters of the movie have the ability to fly, we came up with the idea of staging a few “flying people” sightings around NYC. We achieved that illusion by having 3 custom-made aircraft (which were shaped like human beings) fly above designated areas in NYC and NJ.” Clever – and the video footage they provided is equally cool to watch – but that's not why I'm bringing this up.  Something the author of the original article said struck me as odd: "I personally think it’s a ballsy, creative and unique advertising tactic, yet I struggle with wondering how a person would tie the two things together — the movie and the freaky sightings." This is where some people fail to see how various types of marketing can in fact go viral rather easily, and help to spread the name of a brand or an event.  It's not about ensuring that consumers or your target audience make an immediate and direct connection to your brand, product or service, it's about garnering attention. In the case of the "flying people", there's no banner being towed behind them.  There's no subtle images in the background.  It's just flying people.  As heads turned and people had their cameras skyward, they were likely going to be discussing the incident around the water cool, subway, over lunch, etc.  You can bet journalists and bloggers would be reporting on it as well (TechCrunch, here, etc.).  That's the main goal of the marketing agency from go. We are all a part of the master marketing strategy. If they were obvious about it being a movie promo, the social share level would likely be far less.  "Oh I saw this cool thing with people flying near the bridge, they were promoting Chronicle."  Some people might agree that's cool and may mention it in passing. With this scenario, you had a lot more people going "oh my god did you hear about those flying people? Check out this video I uploaded" to which it's shared as people try to figure out what they're seeing in user-taken video. The connection is made via journalists who reveal it, making the connection and showing off the setup video.  There's an "Aha" moment for people who discover it and make the connection, and it becomes a memorable experience – one that inspired "ooo's"  and "aaaa's" – that can be linked to the studio brand and the movie. The very fact that TechCrunch and virtually thousands of others reported on it (even us!) makes it worthwhile from a publicity standpoint. Think about how you're marketing your business – when it comes down to Alabama marketing, are you pitching too hard or are you providing something of value that can become a talking point around your brand? WordPress › Error html { background: #f9f9f9; } body { background: #fff; color: #333; font-family: sans-serif; margin: 2em auto; padding: 1em 2em; -webkit-border-radius: 3px; border-radius: 3px; border: 1px solid #dfdfdf; max-width: 700px; } #error-page { margin-top: 50px; } #error-page p { font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.5; margin: 25px 0 20px; } #error-page code { font-family: Consolas, Monaco, monospace; } ul li { margin-bottom: 10px; font-size: 14px ; } a { color: #21759B; text-decoration: none; } a:hover { color: #D54E21; } .button { font-family: sans-serif; text-decoration: none; font-size: 14px !important; line-height: 16px; padding: 6px 12px; cursor: pointer; border: 1px solid #bbb; color: #464646; -webkit-border-radius: 15px; border-radius: 15px; -moz-box-sizing: content-box; -webkit-box-sizing: content-box; box-sizing: content-box; background-color: #f5f5f5; background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #ffffff, #f2f2f2); background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #ffffff, #f2f2f2); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #ffffff, #f2f2f2); background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#ffffff), to(#f2f2f2)); background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #ffffff, #f2f2f2); background-image: linear-gradient(top, #ffffff, #f2f2f2); } .button:hover { color: #000; border-color: #666; } .button:active { background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #f2f2f2, #ffffff); background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #f2f2f2, #ffffff); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #f2f2f2, #ffffff); background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#f2f2f2), to(#ffffff)); background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #f2f2f2, #ffffff); background-image: linear-gradient(top, #f2f2f2, #ffffff); } […]