How to Sync external audio and DSLR video in FCPX

by planetMitch3 Comments

A short tutorial we found this morning for syncing HDSLR footage with external audio in the new Apple Final Cut Pro X – many filmmakers creating DSLR video these days are using external devices like the Zoom H4n (reviews) to record the audio – and with FCP 7 are using software like PluralEyes to sync the sound. In FCPX, it is now very easy to sync and here's one of the first tutorials we've seen.


Redrock Micro


The tutorial

How to Sync DSLR Footage with Final Cut Pro X from Web Video Chefs on Vimeo.



A tutorial on how to sync DSLR footage or an external audio footage with Final Cut Pro.

Visit www.webvideochefs.com for more video tutorials.

[source: webvideochefs]

(cover photo credit: snap from the video)

Zeiss Cinema Lenses

Comments

  1. FrontFoot

    There has got to be a better way. When I shoot, I typically have 2 camera and come back with over 100 clips, I can’t sync them one at a time like that.

    1. James

      There is a better way. Create a synced file like he says (or by selecting two clips and pressing command-option-G), and then click on the file and view that file in the inspector (hit command-4 or press the i icon to the right of the effects icon bar).
      Select the Audio panel in the inspector. Under Channel Configuration, you should see both of the audio sources checked (primary audio is blue, secondary is green). Uncheck the primary, and then all you’re left with is the secondary audio.

      If you organize your files well, syncing a bunch of videos with secondary audio is A LOT faster than it used to be without a program like Pluraleyes.

      This is the fastest way I’ve seen to do it, but maybe there’s a faster way. Also, I haven’t found a way to sync clips that are already in the timeline with a secondary audio source, so you need to do all of the syncing before you start editing.

      Hope this helped!

  2. Phil

    Amazing. You just made my day with that little tutorial. It even appears to slow the audio down that .01 percent that was original required in final cut7.

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